Field Telephone Pro...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Field Telephone Project

 
(@tommy9151)
Reputable Member

Oddball probably may remember this one. I expressed interest in making a field telephone simply because I lack the knowledge and skill to manufacture radios. Ever since Monte La Difensa back in 2013, I've been attempting to do just that.

Finally, after more than a year of off and on clueless experimentation, burning myself with a soldering iron and looking blankly at diagrams. I've been able to make such a breakthrough. About 45 minutes ago, I was able to connect together two rewired handsets that were originally IPhone attachments and hear myself... Which does sound rather sad, but I'm rather pleased with the progress I've finally made.

I have high hopes that I'll be able to perfect some form of design that will be usable in the field, other than that it's good experience.

Weapons:
King Arms M1928 Thompson Submachine Gun
AGM Sten Mk.II
CYMA M1911 EAP

Quote
Topic starter Posted : 14/12/2014 4:35 am




CHThree
(@chthree)
Noble Member

We use actual field telephones. The technology still works and they are actually still cheaper than iphones.



ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/12/2014 1:11 pm




(@tommy9151)
Reputable Member

I remember seeing some in videos, but I don't know where to obtain them for a reasonable price, sir.

Weapons:
King Arms M1928 Thompson Submachine Gun
AGM Sten Mk.II
CYMA M1911 EAP

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 14/12/2014 1:42 pm




Moss
 Moss
(@moss)
Prominent Member

I've seen a fair few at car boot sales, I think they were only about £20-£30. I think these are the sort of prices you can expect, but don't hold me to that.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/12/2014 2:12 pm




BootedFeet
(@bootedfeet)
Honorable Member

Post war Czech ones can usually be picked up at a reasonable sort of price, along with others, just hunt around on Fleabay and the net's various purveyors of army surplus tat.

I've fired a bullet on every continent. Nearly hit someone, too.



ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/12/2014 7:58 pm




Moss
 Moss
(@moss)
Prominent Member

The ones I saw were Brit army ones (at least I think so, the instructions were in English) but I've also seen the Czech ones on eBay and the like going rather cheap. One place I saw them going for 2 sets for £30, I might try and find them again.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/12/2014 9:56 pm




dcheetham89
(@dcheetham89)
Reputable Member

Thats great, well done. on the subject though if anyone sees a decent set going, I wouldn't mind giving them a go. I'd rather have british ones though but I'm sure no one would mind if they weren't, field telephones are just cool. McVickers could I pick your brain for help if i need? seem to remember you sorting them out at Crete :good:

Edit: early morning Illiteracy

ReplyQuote
Posted : 16/12/2014 8:00 am




McVickers
(@mcvickers)
Famed Member

McVickers could I pick your brain for help if i need? seem to remember you sorting them out at Crete :good:y

Standing by, ready for questioning!

Got lots of operation documentation and test details for most of the phone models/'types'. And personal hints/tips/tricks I've learnt through 8 years of collecting and operating these things.

Funnily enough, I was just sorting through my field telephones and their associated ancillaries last night while re-arranging the house - I think they must be multiplying on their own, got a small mountain in the "to restore" pile now! Getting the first few, on your own, can be a little pricey - but keep on looking and you'll find a bargain. My start was picking up two Type F 'field' phones (A desk phone really) without their wooden carry cases, for £10 for both at W&P back in 2006. Got them working and picked up a Type L and some post-war Type Js at carboot sales the following years. Once people start noticing you collecting/using/displaying them at airsoft/reenactment events, you start getting donations to your collection! Last year, I was left 8 matching Type Fs with their carry cases in a will! :shock:

A Proud Member Of 'Team Spleen!' who play mainly at Gunman Airsoft, Tuddenham, Suffolk.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 16/12/2014 8:24 am




BootedFeet
(@bootedfeet)
Honorable Member

https://www.varusteleka.com/en/product/ ... used/28586

Some American ones here on Varusteleka. Possible Lend-lease?

I've fired a bullet on every continent. Nearly hit someone, too.



ReplyQuote
Posted : 16/12/2014 10:18 am




dcheetham89
(@dcheetham89)
Reputable Member

That is interesting, looks nice, though i would have to buy 2, which I plan to anyway but at 40 euro a pop its not cheap, how are these compared to ww2 issued ones?
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2-army-signal ... 1514027337

ReplyQuote
Posted : 16/12/2014 7:59 pm




McVickers
(@mcvickers)
Famed Member

That is interesting, looks nice, though i would have to buy 2, which I plan to anyway but at 40 euro a pop its not cheap, how are these compared to ww2 issued ones?
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2-army-signal ... 1514027337

Very much 'unlike' matey, unfortunately. They're cheap and plastic. Josh got so pissed off trying to get the ones he bought working he pitched them in a WW2 weekend bonfire back in 2008...

WW2 British Field Telephones (not including weirdities such as RAF airfield defence phones, etc...)
Aim for (lower price = tatty condition - upper price = really good condition + £5-£10 on to each top price for "fresh-from-the-REME-mint-condition"):
~£12-35 for Type F MkI, same as MkII below, but made with an aluminium chassis rather than the economy Bakelite chassis of the MkII - quite rare.
~£5-15 for Type F MkIIs, they're common enough, and aren't really suited to "in the field" use (though this doesn't stop them being the most commonly seen ones reenactors use as such :roll: )
~£8-20 for Type Ls, they're the ones you mainly want - the real work-horse of the British Army wired communications systems.
~£10-30 for Type D MkVs (and MkV*), These are the second most commonest for field use, and were really nice units to use, nicely designed. With either one-piece moulded aluminium cover or multi-piece welded steel cover. The MkV* variant had the headset removed and it's terminals jumper-linked, so are worth a little less than a standard MkV.
~£5-£15 for Type Hs, they look just like Type Ls, but are "sound powered" and not compatible with central battery/magneto telephony systems (which all these other ones listed are). Don't bother buying, unless for your collection, and they're not that common.
~£20-80 for Type D MkIII, a leather cased WW1 design of the Type D, which looks nothing like the MkV model. I list it here because it was still in use and favoured by Royal Signal linesmen.
~£5-10 for Type Js, same style case as Type L and Type H models, but without any sound vents and non removable handset, because they were basically a tropicalised version of the Type L. Designed and first built during late '44/'45 they were part of the British Army's drive for jungle combat equipment (along with '44patt webbing ,etc...), but never saw use during the war. Mainly used Korea/'50s-'70s and for post-war Civil Defence units*.

A big tip, I've found, is if they're scruffy and been kept in an environment which may have been a little on the damp side, then they're usually quite easy to get working again (or work fine straight away), but if they've been dry stored and look perfectly rust-free and clean, then I find that all the rubber wire insulation and flexible handset cabling has perished and there's shorts everywhere which means a major re-wiring job, especially if you try to keep the wiring looking period/original (like I do).

*[Funnily enough, when I lived down in Oxford, I picked up from Marlow two Type Js and a tropicalised 10-way switchboard, which had previously been in the use of Derby City CD - I've now ended up moving to Derby and seemingly 'bought them home'!]

A Proud Member Of 'Team Spleen!' who play mainly at Gunman Airsoft, Tuddenham, Suffolk.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 17/12/2014 12:33 am




(@tommy9151)
Reputable Member

two Type F 'field' phones (A desk phone really) without their wooden carry cases, for £10 for both at W&P back in 2006.

The whole point I actually began this project was because I was deterred by the fact that the British field phones, specifically the type F, which I think looks very beautiful by the way, apparently had batteries that are no longer manufactured. So, I wanted to make "economy" versions of both the Type F and J on the cheap with modern, newly bought components.

Weapons:
King Arms M1928 Thompson Submachine Gun
AGM Sten Mk.II
CYMA M1911 EAP

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 17/12/2014 3:54 pm




McVickers
(@mcvickers)
Famed Member

two Type F 'field' phones (A desk phone really) without their wooden carry cases, for £10 for both at W&P back in 2006.

The whole point I actually began this project was because I was deterred by the fact that the British field phones, specifically the type F, which I think looks very beautiful by the way, apparently had batteries that are no longer manufactured. So, I wanted to make "economy" versions of both the Type F and J on the cheap with modern, newly bought components.

Oh, is that all the problem is?
If there was no way to power them any more, then my collection and restoration to working condition would be a pretty useless pass-time...!

Don't worry about the batteries - they were 2 of 1.5V cells, and so any 2 AAA, AA, C or D cells in a suitable holder will get a phone powered. Some idiots put 6V or 9V lamp batteries inside them ("duh, moar powah meens moar workyness!") which does work for a while, but overdrives the output and can lead to the carbon mic failing sooner and sometimes the coil wires burning out. I recommend a double D-cell holder (like this: http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/2-d-battery-box-jg72p), modified with two M3 counter-sink head screws passed through the centre holes (with nuts on the other side) of the two top spring contacts to act as the screw-post terminals to allow attachment to the original terminal wires. The holder slots nicely into the original battery recess. And if the original terminal wires are missing and you can't be bothered replacing them, you can ignore the screws for terminals and attach a PP3 clip (like this: http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/pp3-rigid-battery-clip-ne19v) onto the PP3 terminals of the holder and wire straight to the telephones circuitry.

A Proud Member Of 'Team Spleen!' who play mainly at Gunman Airsoft, Tuddenham, Suffolk.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 17/12/2014 6:01 pm




dcheetham89
(@dcheetham89)
Reputable Member

That is interesting, looks nice, though i would have to buy 2, which I plan to anyway but at 40 euro a pop its not cheap, how are these compared to ww2 issued ones?
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2-army-signal ... 1514027337

Very much 'unlike' matey, unfortunately. They're cheap and plastic. Josh got so pissed off trying to get the ones he bought working he pitched them in a WW2 weekend bonfire back in 2008...

WW2 British Field Telephones (not including weirdities such as RAF airfield defence phones, etc...)
Aim for (lower price = tatty condition - upper price = really good condition + £5-£10 on to each top price for "fresh-from-the-REME-mint-condition"):
~£12-35 for Type F MkI, same as MkII below, but made with an aluminium chassis rather than the economy Bakelite chassis of the MkII - quite rare.
~£5-15 for Type F MkIIs, they're common enough, and aren't really suited to "in the field" use (though this doesn't stop them being the most commonly seen ones reenactors use as such :roll: )
~£8-20 for Type Ls, they're the ones you mainly want - the real work-horse of the British Army wired communications systems.
~£10-30 for Type D MkVs (and MkV*), These are the second most commonest for field use, and were really nice units to use, nicely designed. With either one-piece moulded aluminium cover or multi-piece welded steel cover. The MkV* variant had the headset removed and it's terminals jumper-linked, so are worth a little less than a standard MkV.
~£5-£15 for Type Hs, they look just like Type Ls, but are "sound powered" and not compatible with central battery/magneto telephony systems (which all these other ones listed are). Don't bother buying, unless for your collection, and they're not that common.
~£20-80 for Type D MkIII, a leather cased WW1 design of the Type D, which looks nothing like the MkV model. I list it here because it was still in use and favoured by Royal Signal linesmen.
~£5-10 for Type Js, same style case as Type L and Type H models, but without any sound vents and non removable handset, because they were basically a tropicalised version of the Type L. Designed and first built during late '44/'45 they were part of the British Army's drive for jungle combat equipment (along with '44patt webbing ,etc...), but never saw use during the war. Mainly used Korea/'50s-'70s and for post-war Civil Defence units*.

A big tip, I've found, is if they're scruffy and been kept in an environment which may have been a little on the damp side, then they're usually quite easy to get working again (or work fine straight away), but if they've been dry stored and look perfectly rust-free and clean, then I find that all the rubber wire insulation and flexible handset cabling has perished and there's shorts everywhere which means a major re-wiring job, especially if you try to keep the wiring looking period/original (like I do).

*[Funnily enough, when I lived down in Oxford, I picked up from Marlow two Type Js and a tropicalised 10-way switchboard, which had previously been in the use of Derby City CD - I've not ended up moving to Derby and seemingly 'bought them home'!]

Thanks for that mate, your a star, will keep a eye out where ever I can, If you see any going you'd think were good and don't want for yourself let me know :D

ReplyQuote
Posted : 17/12/2014 9:57 pm




TheChef
(@thechef)
Honorable Member

Just to pick this up again, and pick the brains of you guys out there, with regard to field phones such as this http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/361098206346 how compatible are these with other types of field phones, i.e. do you have to get two exactly the same to work? also what about power? are they typically battery powered or wind up dynamo, or what?

German

Russian

British

Japanese

ReplyQuote
Posted : 22/03/2015 9:12 pm




(@tommy9151)
Reputable Member

In terms of power, I believe the standard is a battery for the communication part such as speaking between phones, while the ringer will be a hand crank that is independent from the battery or a buzzer that functions off the battery, sir.

Weapons:
King Arms M1928 Thompson Submachine Gun
AGM Sten Mk.II
CYMA M1911 EAP

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 22/03/2015 11:05 pm




_Arthur
(@_arthur)
Estimable Member

And a bit pricy, here you can get the same for Euro 20,- /piece
http://www.militaria4you.com/paginas/ar ... php?id=324

They are using 2 D-Cell batteries which you can buy everywhere; supermarket, DIYshop etc.

I would look for them at a militaria fair, carbootsale etc.

http://www.ww2airsoft.eu

ReplyQuote
Posted : 23/03/2015 7:32 am




McVickers
(@mcvickers)
Famed Member

i.e. do you have to get two exactly the same to work? also what about power? are they typically battery powered or wind up dynamo, or what?

No, most wartime and post-war British, German, Czech', US,... field phones will happily work together, as long as they are local battery and can magneto call.

In terms of power, I believe the standard is a battery for the communication part such as speaking between phones, while the ringer will be a hand crank that is independent from the battery or a buzzer that functions off the battery, sir.

Tommy9151 is correct with his belief - field telephones are either battery powered ('local' - a battery in the set, or 'central' - powered along the telephone lines) or 'sound' powered (low-level induction). The dynamo is there only to call a "magneto ring" call. As Tommy9151 also alluded to, calling could be done without a dynamo, by employing a buzzer circuit which would send a loud tone down to the recipients receiver ear-piece.

Of the period British field telephones:
Type D MkIII - Could buzzer call ONLY
Type D MkV - Could magneto ring AND buzzer call (if the appropriate buzzer unit was fitted, rather than just the basic telephone coil unit)
Type F (all Mks) - Could magneto ring AND buzzer call (if the appropriate buzzer unit was fitted, rather than just the basic telephone coil unit)
Type H - Could magneto ring ONLY
Type L - Could magneto ring ONLY
Type J - Could magneto ring ONLY

You can see how in the inter-war period, buzzer calling was seen to be the way foward, with most 'magneto call only' sets from WW1 being replaced with models which would call by buzzer instead (far neater, faster, less breakable solution to having to wind a handle to ring delicate bells...), and then nearing WW2 the designing also employed magneto ringing again as well as buzzer call, with magneto ringing finally taking over as the dominant call method for many years after.

A Proud Member Of 'Team Spleen!' who play mainly at Gunman Airsoft, Tuddenham, Suffolk.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/03/2015 9:39 am




dieselmonkey
(@dieselmonkey)
Noble Member

Just to pick this up again, and pick the brains of you guys out there, with regard to field phones such as this http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/361098206346 how compatible are these with other types of field phones, i.e. do you have to get two exactly the same to work? also what about power? are they typically battery powered or wind up dynamo, or what?

Pretty certain they all run off the same basic principle, and all mine have 2x1.5v batteries in.

I've certainly connected British ones to German and US ones in the past, with no issues.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/05/2015 8:44 pm







Share: