SAS Troops Information

Notes for troops - private area
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Sgt.Heide
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SAS Troops Information

Postby Sgt.Heide » Wed Jun 16, 2010 3:57 pm

Right-o chaps, we're a little understrength so far but we won't let that stop us from creating havoc for the Germans. It just means a bigger workload for us with less numbers. I'll get the "airsoft" stuff out of the way here, as I don't really want to be covering it at the event, so we can all be "in character" the second we leave the cars behind. We will operate in the standard 4 man SAS patrols. I'll sort out who is with who in the very near future.

If you haven't seen the kitlist, please have a look now and let us know if you're short of anything. Don't obsess about anal crap like badges, just make sure you've got adequate clothing, shelter, food & water, a weapon and something dry and warm to sleep in. A watch is also essential kit for all SAS troopers.

We will have a walk of 100 metres or so from where we will park our cars, to the harbor area. For this walk, you will need to carry everything you need for the full 24 hours, including tents if you're planning on using one. We will NOT return to the cars until endex, except for an emergency. Once we reach the harbor area, we will cache our bergens and get on with it. Our shelters and tents will need to be camouflaged in some way as well.

Weapons - I recommend an smg, for sheer firepower and practicality. We will be dramatically outnumbered and outgunned, so every little helps! Sidearms are optional. Smoke grenades are handy for covering any retreats.

There is a very real possibility that you may be captured by the enemy. If this happens, consider yourself to be disarmed, even if you have a pistol and/or a rubber knife hidden down your pants. You will have your weapon and belt kit taken from you by the enemy. You may attempt escape if you are captured (the set of orders I give will include an escape & evasion contingency if you're brave enough to attempt escape). Obviously, if you do manage to escape captivity, you will be completely alone and unarmed. After a period of captivity, you will be reinserted into the battle - you will be given back your belt kit and unloaded weapon and you will not be allowed to reload the weapon until you rejoin friendly forces. You won't have to suffer stress positions or any of that bollocks but you will be blindfolded and don't expect tea & biscuits from your captors either! If you are captured, the only information you will give will be name, rank, number and date of birth (you could get further into character by making up suitable ones for yourselves). Any other questions asked will be replied to with "I cannot answer that question".

The trick to being a "successful" pow is to come across as a total bag of bollocks. Play on imaginary injuries, every time anyone touches you, moan and groan as if you're in pain. Take your time before replying to questions and generally convince your captors that you're not worth the bother and are out of the game. They may lower their guard sufficiently for you to do a runner, or for you to gain valuable information from them from their conversations, etc. Do not fraternise with the enemy!

Medic & regen rules - On the saturday, the normal "hit and medic" rule will apply but, with a couple of twists. If a friendly player medics you, you're back in play. If an enemy medics you, you are "captured". On your second hit, you are considered to have a more serious wound and must stay put for 20 minutes, during which time, you can still be captured. During those 20 minutes, you may not move, nor talk to anyone. Once the 20 minutes are passed, you can remove your bandage and rejoin your team mates. The CiA rule of "don't be a cock" applies here. If you're 10 feet away behind the enemy, don't stand up and hose them, use your common sense, stay put and get out of there and then, rejoin your patrol. You may attempt to rescue a captured team mate, if you are successful, they may remove their bandage after 20 minutes.

On day 2, we will use different rules for medic/regen. Each patrol will have a medic bag, containing 8 additional bandages. These can be applied to anyone in that patrol, by anyone in that patrol. So, after your first hit, anyone can apply your "personal" bandage. On second and subsequent hits, anyone can apply a bandage from the medic bag, until the bandages are all gone. Once this happens, that is it. You are considered "dead" after any subsequent hit once all the bandages are gone and will take no further part in the battle. Hopefully, this won't happen, as we'll be using hit and run tactics, rather than getting bogged down in gay firefights. We won't need a designated medic, as everyone in the SAS was/is first aid trained, so the medic bag can be passed around within the patrol.

Ammo limits- SAS troops will have 600 rounds per "life", ie, only after your second hit can you reload your magazines. On the second day, you can reload after every bandage application. There is no limit to how much ammo you can carry, just what you can have in your magazines. There is no limit to how much pyro you can carry.
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BedsnHerts
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Re: SAS troops information.

Postby BedsnHerts » Fri Jun 18, 2010 9:08 am

So second hit effectively means you're dead for 20 mins and then re-gen on the spot in full health without bandage?

Does a grenade or mortar blast count as light or serious wound?
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webby
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Re: SAS troops information.

Postby webby » Fri Jun 18, 2010 9:38 am

Sgt.Heide wrote: If you're 10 feet away behind the enemy, don't stand up and hose them, use your common sense, stay put and get out of there and then, rejoin your patrol.


I should imagine if you were close enough you would find yourself captured anyway. Sounds fine to me :)
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Sgt.Heide
Fought at the Battle of Hastings
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Re: SAS troops information.

Postby Sgt.Heide » Fri Jun 18, 2010 11:32 am

BedsnHerts wrote:So second hit effectively means you're dead for 20 mins and then re-gen on the spot in full health without bandage?

Does a grenade or mortar blast count as light or serious wound?


Basically Martin, yes, on point one. Everyone will need a watch, obviously!

Good point about the blast though, I forgot that. A grenade or mortar blast is an immediate "kill", with no option to medic on day one.
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Sgt.Heide
Fought at the Battle of Hastings
Fought at the Battle of Hastings
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Re: SAS Troops Information

Postby Sgt.Heide » Sun Jun 27, 2010 9:08 pm

A watch is an essential for all SAS troopers too. If you are given timings, you need to stick to them. It's no good being in position to lay down fire support at 1900hrs, if you were meant to be there at 1855hrs!

Also, you will be covering pretty large distances, so, be sure to look after your feet! Good insoles and socks, coupled with sturdy boots will help no end.

Consider all ground that you cover to be under observation by the enemy and be alert at all times, you absolutely cannot switch off for even a moment when on operations. Let your guard down for a second and you will get bumped, then, killed or captured. Every half hour or so (or less, if you feel the need), stop, get down in all round defence and listen. Retune yourself to your surroundings and observe the ground. This will keep you switched on and give you the edge on the enemy crashing about looking for you. If the enemy are near, keep them covered with your weapons but do NOT open fire unless you are in direct peril, or your orders give you permission to engage. Let them pass and continue on task, safe in the knowledge that you now have less enemy to worry about at your objective.
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